Case management orders

Provincial Court

Introduction

Apply to get a case management order if you need an order to move your court case along or address some specific concern. These orders aren't for orders about the main issues in your case.

Case management (procedural) orders can be made at any time during your case.

Case management orders can be either with notice or without notice. There are different forms for each type.

Do I need a case management order with notice or without notice?

This form is for orders that may harm or prejudice the other person, or where they should have a say in the order. You must serve Case Management Orders with Notice (Form 10) on the other person. Then you'll go to a hearing (court appearance) to ask for these orders. During the COVID-19 pandemic, this hearing will be virtual.

Examples of these orders include:

  • Transferring the court file to another registry
  • Correcting or changing a filed document
  • Requiring that information be disclosed by a third party
  • Recognizing an order made outside of BC (other than a support order)
  • Waiving or modifying service of documents
  • Adjournments
  • Ordering a report about the best interest of a child (s.211 report)
  • Settling or correcting the terms of an order

This form is for basic orders that are unlikely to affect the other person in any way. This form can only be used for a very limited set of orders. You don't have to go to a hearing for these orders.

Examples of these orders include:

  • Attending a conference or hearing through electronic means
  • Shortening or waiving service requirements
  • Waiving or modifying anything under the rules
  • Recognizing an order made outside BC (other than a support order)

Choose which step-by-step guide you want:

Get a case management order with notice

Get a case management order without notice

If you don't know which form to fill out, please talk to duty counsel, a lawyer, or any free legal service.

Get legal help

It's a good idea to get some legal help before you use this guide. If you can't afford a lawyer, you can get legal help in other ways, including:

Staff at Justice Access Centres in Nanaimo, Surrey, Vancouver, and Victoria can also answer your questions and help you fill out forms.

For information about legal aid, see the Legal Aid BC website.